The Liberal Democratic Party's plan to split equally the amount of time for questions in the Diet between members of its ruling coalition and members of rival parties has been rejected by the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party.

Hiroshi Moriyama, chairman of the LDP’s Diet Affairs Committee, met with his CDP counterpart, Kiyomi Tsujimoto, at the Diet building in Tokyo on the morning of Nov. 10 and told her of the ruling coalition's 50-50 plan for various committee meetings.

Tsujimoto rejected the proposal as “unacceptable.”

At a Lower House Budget Committee, in which general government affairs are discussed, for example, the question time has been traditionally allotted at a ratio of 2 to 8 between the ruling parties and opposition.

After the meeting, Moriyama told the media that the LDP suggestion was a generous one, and that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who also is the LDP president, had said the allotment of time for questions should better reflect how many members the party has in the Lower House.

Moriyama said if question time was allotted proportionally to the number of seats a party held after the recent Lower House election, the ratio would be 7 to 3 for the ruling coalition, including the LDP, against the opposition parties.

He added, "Giving consideration to the fact there are many parties and factions (in the Diet, including opposition parties) we are happy to make it 5 to 5.”

To pursue the plan, he said he would negotiate with opposition party members in various committees at director meetings.