Photo/IllutrationGolden State Warriors' Stephen Curry gives a thumb up while coaching at a high school basketball camp on June 23 in Tokyo. (AP Photo)

Stephen Curry is already looking ahead to the next challenge in his basketball career, including the chance to represent the United States at next year's Tokyo Olympics.

Just over a week since his Golden State Warriors lost a grueling NBA Finals to the Toronto Raptors, Curry was in Tokyo on Sunday talking about the Olympics and the opportunity to face Japan's newest basketball sensation.

The U.S. has won the gold medal in the last three Olympics and will be the favorite to top the podium again in Tokyo with a Dream Team that could feature such stars as Curry, LeBron James and Kawhi Leonard.

Curry decided to pull out of the Rio Olympics due to several factors, including ankle and knee injuries.

"I know the energy here is going to be amazing," Curry said. "I haven't played in the Olympics before. I've played in two World Cup teams so I've had the experience of representing my country playing for the national team. But the Olympics, from everybody that I've talked to that's played, there's no comparison to that experience."

Curry was in Tokyo for a youth basketball clinic and was asked about Rui Hachimura, who became the first player from Japan picked in the first round of the NBA draft when he was taken with the No. 9 overall pick by the rebuilding Washington Wizards on Thursday.

"It's exciting for the NBA to have representation from Japan and countries all over the world," Curry said. "It speaks to how the game of basketball is growing everywhere, especially here. For him to be a trailblazer in terms of doing something that has never been done is good for this country."

The 6-foot-8, 235-pound (2.03 meters, 106 kilogram) Hachimura averaged a team-leading 19.7 points and 6.5 rebounds last season as a junior at U.S. college Gonzaga, where he was the West Coast Conference player of the year.

The only other Japanese player drafted in NBA history was Yasutaka Okayama, who went 171st overall in 1981. He never appeared in a regular-season game, something just two players from the country have done: Yuta Tabuse for the Phoenix Suns in 2004-05, and Yuta Watanabe for the Memphis Grizzlies in 2018-19.

The son of a Japanese mother and father from the Republic of Benin, Hachimura is the latest Japanese of mixed race to make a splash in the sporting world following the likes of Naomi Osaka and Yu Darvish.

"Just from watching him play, I know he's got good size, obviously," Curry said. "He seems to have a high basketball IQ, good touch around the rim too. I'm sure as he gets into the NBA his game will expand. I think he fits into the direction the NBA is going right now; being able to score and put pressure on the defense no matter what the situation is."

As for the Warriors, Curry said he's looking forward to winning more championships with the team.

"The story is still going," Curry said. "A lot of people said this is going to be the end but I'm not going to let that happen. It's going to be fun to come back and chase more championships next year and beyond."