Photo/IllutrationA third-year junior high school girl carries school supplies she plucked from the mud that buried the first floor of her home in Marumori, Miyagi Prefecture, at 1:22 p.m. on Oct. 17. Driftwood and other debris litter the neighborhood. (Yosuke Fukudome)

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The full extent of the devastation caused by Typhoon No. 19 remains unclear a week after the storm brought unprecedented downpours to eastern Japan.

As of Oct. 19, 81 people were confirmed dead and 10 were still missing.

Special alerts for heavy rain were issued in Tokyo and 12 prefectures in eastern Japan during the Oct. 12-13 typhoon.

Riverbanks were breached at 128 areas along 71 rivers running through seven prefectures. Mudslides were reported at 365 sites in Tokyo and 19 prefectures.