JAPANESE

The text area starts here.

  • Before reading this site

Messages from Hiroshima

Japanese version

Noboru Katayama (male)
'Chokubaku'  1.7 km from the hypocenter / 13 years old at the time / current resident of Tokyo
12265

The scenes of the A-bombed city are introduced here. The photographs are not directly connected with the messages. When I was in the sixth grade at Nakajima National Elementary School, I became seriously ill and had to repeat another year in school. Four months prior to the atomic bombing, we were forced to move from Shimonaka-machi (800 m) to Danbara Shin-machi (1,200 m) due to the demolition of buildings and houses, and I had to change schools to Danbara National Elementary School. I was exposed to the atomic bomb while I was on the second floor of the school building, and I was trapped under the collapsed building. On that day, I experienced "the last day of Earth," "the extinction of mankind," and "the end of human beings," in atomic bomb hell.

Only a few, among 30 students from the neighborhood, and some fifth and sixth graders who remained from group evacuation, could be rescued. Because of the approaching fire, I ran off while my friends were calling for help. In this hell, I myself lost my humanity. Since then, I have been living with a feeling that "I failed to die," rather than with a feeling that I managed to survive.

I grew up in the Nakajima area, the hypocenter. I had to repeat a year of school due to illness, and we had to move to the Danbara area because of the demolition of buildings and houses. My father (Chugoku Shimbunsha 900m) and my brother were killed. People in the Nakajima area, where I grew up, had been working on the sixth demolition of buildings and houses, which included the mobilization of 9,000 townspeople, 1,000 members of the Volunteer Army Corps, and about 1,900 students from 11 schools who were mainly students in their first year. Most of them were killed before seeing their parents who came to the rescue.

Most of my classmates from Nakajima National Elementary School, who went to middle schools and girls' schools, were mobilized for demolition of buildings and houses, and 5,900 people were killed.

"Not allowed to live or die as a person"
Death that stripped away the dignity of a human being was forced on people, and carrying the regrets of those who died, I have been calling out, "No more Hiroshima!"

We victims of the atomic bomb wandered about a hell on earth. What happened under the mushroom cloud was beyond imagination or explanation of any kind. Death that stripped away a person's dignity was forced on people there. Survivors were deeply traumatized psychologically, and they have been living with that pain.

We strongly feel from the bottom of our hearts that nobody should experience such suffering ever again.

"No more!" instead of "Remember."
Taking into account the thoughts of the atomic bomb survivors that are incorporated in the words "No more," I would like to dedicate the rest of my life to making their wishes come true.
I wish to pass on their thoughts to the next generation.
I want the thoughts and wishes of the deceased to continue to live in people's hearts.
People created the atomic bomb. People also used the atomic bomb. People can abandon the atomic bomb.
Nuclear weapons are weapons of the Devil that cannot co-exist with people.

Survivors of the atomic bomb have been fighting for a long time against the argument that war is permissible. To support the survivors of the atomic bomb, we as a nation, both domestically and internationally, must express the determination to never repeat such a tragedy. Japan, as the nation that was exposed to the atomic bomb, should now take the lead.
(2010)