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Messages from Nagasaki

Japanese version

Anonymous (female)
'Kyugo hibaku'  / 24 years old at the time
2123

Photographer: Eiichi Matsumoto.
The scenes of the A-bombed city are introduced here. The photographs are not directly connected with the messages.
I was a teacher during the war. I was at home when the Atomic-bomb got dropped on Nagasaki. When I went to my school on 10th (next day), our principal told us the seven young teachers to go help the survivors at a nearby high school. A young male whose body was burned black came close to me. He gestured and asked me to scoop up water, but he could not speak. It was a big shock. As I looked around auditoriums and classrooms there were so many who looked as terrible as him. I could not believe my eyes at how awful a human being could become. This was the first time I ever questioned if we could ever win this war. In the treatment room, there were no nurses only a midwife and she asked me to help. Those victims who I could bandage and help put clothes on were fortunate. There were many who could not get up and come to get treatment. Those ones passed away the next day. On the third day, there were only a few survivors left. I cannot forget that I cried seeing a male college student from Osaka crying out and calling for his mother.

Everyday on the way home, I saw a scene of a big fire where people were cremating the dead in a field. The scene comes back to me whenever I pass by the area. I still wonder if those ashes reached their family.

Everyday on the way home, I saw a scene of a big fire where people were cremating the dead in a field. The scene comes back to me whenever I pass by the area. I still wonder if those ashes reached their family.

Whenever I have a chance, I tell my family the stories about war. I wonder if we will ever have a world without wars. When I think of those victims, I strongly feel that we should never repeat the war again and that we should focus on educating the generations to come .
(2005)